Rosemary & Thyme Herb Butter

I've always loved baking. In high school I spent weekends making cupcakes and cookies (you know, like a normal 15 year old), and started college dreaming of one day opening my own bakery.

Although I've changed course quite a bit, I still spend a lot of time in the kitchen. In an attempt to become a more knowledgeable home cook I've been working my way through Alice Waters' book The Art of Simple Food. A proponent of farm-to-table cooking long before it was a trend, Alice Waters seeks to create memorable meals by finding quality, seasonal ingredients and cooking or preparing them simply. In the book she not only provides hundreds of recipes - from homemade vinaigrette dressing and apricot jam, to roasted chicken and sautéed brussels sprouts - she also offers tips for keeping a well-stocked pantry and uses each page as an opportunity to teach. It's a wonderful place to start for anyone looking to brush up on their cooking and baking basics, and everyone should just go buy it already, geez.

Since I've recently been gifted an herb garden I was excited to try my hand at making a butter using fresh-cut herbs. The recipe below is based on the one in Alice Waters' book, but has been slightly adapted to suit my own tastes. Enjoy.


rosemary & thyme herb butter

  • 1/2 cup (1 stick) of unsalted butter, softened
  • 2 tbsp. fresh rosemary and thyme, chopped
  • 1 clove of garlic, finely chopped
  • salt and pepper, to taste
  • squeeze of lemon juice

Melt half of the butter in a saucepan over low heat. Add the herbs, slowly mixing for a couple of minutes until fragrant. 

Let the mixture cool in the fridge until or on the counter until room temperature.

Once cooled, add in the rest of the butter, garlic, salt and pepper. Finish off with a squeeze of lemon juice, to enhance the flavors. 

Pour into a bowl or small container, cover and refrigerate until ready to use.

Adventures of an Aspiring Plant Lady: Here We Go

Keeping a plant alive is hard. A dog or cat will offer a variety of expressions or behaviors to indicate something is wrong; they'll stop eating for a few days, their stomach will make noise, and if they're in pain they'll yelp or meow. They look up at you with their adorable little animal eyes and say "hey, I need to go on a walk" or "please stop bothering me I'm trying to sleep".

But plants just sit there, and wilt. And wilting can mean anything. It could be caused by rotting roots from overwatering, or dried out roots from under-watering. It could be because the temperature is too cold, or too hot, or it's too sunny. It could be a sign of a pest infestation, or a desperate plea for some kind of fertilizer. It could even mean your plant is annoyed that you're watching that episode of Friends for the 4th time that week.

Okay, maybe not that last one. But to someone with almost no knowledge of how to keep a plant alive, these vague warning signs are difficult to decipher, and make my aspirations to be a plant lady seem more daunting than my impending graduation from graduate school (it's fine, everything is fine).

So, like Julie Powell, I've decided to document my exploration of this new hobby. Except instead of trying out recipes I'll be trying to keep these little green friends of mine alive, and instead of Julia Child as a guide I have the whole, plant-related internet (an unsurprisingly robust corner of the web).

Above are my latest victims. I mean plants. I have three succulents, basil, and thyme, and will try to post updates and discoveries every month. To start here are a few things I've learned so far:

  1. Basil is surprisingly receptive to water. All of the plants sit on the sill of an east facing window, and on a sunny morning they wake up to very direct, harsh sunlight. By the time I wake up at 8am they've been sunbathing for at least an hour or so, and the basil plant is usually starting to wilt (apparently indoor potted plants tend to dry out much faster and may require more frequent watering). So before I make myself a very necessary cup of coffee, I give these little guys and gals a drink, and I'm always shocked at how quickly the basil leaves perk right up. Within 10 minutes there's a noticeable difference, and the plant goes from looking like a withered 97-year-old man to a lively teen (weird analogy? Idk). Honestly, no matter how long I manage to keep these plants alive, I will always be amazed by this. It's like watching one of those time lapse videos of a flower blooming only it's happening in real life before my eyes. Ah, nature.
  2. You can, in fact, kill succulents. And with relative ease, at that. I learned this well before this month but it was my first clue that I may not be gifted with a green thumb. I hopped on the succulent band wagon after seeing the 400th (rough estimate) Refinery29 article about how easy it is to care for succulents. "They practically take care of themselves!" But no. They don't. Because if you don't water them they die and if you do water them they die. So I decided to turn to people who know more about gardening, and upon purchasing my latest batch of succulents I followed careful instructions from Succulents and Sunshine when repotting them and so far so good. I probably jinxed it just now, though, so we'll see.
  3. Gooseneck coffee kettles (like this one) make for a great watering can. For those of you who, like myself, lack any storage and live in a teeny tiny box, finding household objects with multiple uses is key to living a happy, healthy life. 

That's all I've got, so far, but I'm excited to keep caring for these little plants and learning about indoor plant care. Starting out with monthly posts about problems I've encountered and what I've discovered, and we'll see how this goes.

Green Barn Berry Farm

What's more American than picking fresh blueberries on Fourth of July weekend, you ask? 

Nothing. Not one thing.

This past Friday Joshua and I went with his parents to the Green Barn Berry Farm in Muncy, Pennsylvania and spent a warm, Summer evening picking blueberries. I've since decided to move away from New York City and live on a farm, where I can grow fresh fruits, veggies and herbs in my backyard, spend mornings sipping coffee on my front porch, and store my clothing in a closet instead of on a clothing rack in the middle of my apartment (wait, other people in New York have closets? oh...).

While I was picking (read: eating) blueberries I spent some time playing with my new camera. After almost 5 years with my trusty little Canon Rebel t3i - my very first DSLR - I finally upgraded to a Canon 7D and haven't put it down since. 

Two nights ago Joshua's mom made a delicious blueberry pie to kick off our Independence Day celebrations, and I think later this month I'll take a stab at my very first homemade blueberry jelly. But first, if anyone has a farm they aren't using just let me know. I'll be there in 5 minutes. 

Morning Rituals

School's officially out for summer and while some of my friends are enjoying treks through Europe following their week at the Cannes Film Festival (honestly, their life is so difficult....) I've been spending quite a bit of quality time with this desk chair of mine.

In pre-production for three short films, planning a road-trip to scout for a fourth, and preparing to write a feature in just 3 short months, my latest challenge has been trying to stay sane. And this little corner of my studio apartment is helping me do just that.

Since last summer I've spent almost every morning in this chair, sipping coffee and reading from the pages of Kinfolk Magazine or posts from some of my favorite blogs (Career Girl Daily, A Cup of Jo, and Wit & Delight, to name a few). And these few minutes of time - not responding to emails or finishing up last-minute assignments - have been so beneficial.

Over the past two years of my graduate program I've learned the value of a routine. Whether it's taking time to read for 30 minutes each day, making myself a cup of coffee the second I get out of bed (shout out to my trusty little Aeropress.), or eating dark chocolate every 5 minutes (not really, but almost), forming habits that promote time for myself is really the only way I've been able to make it this far in grad school without losing my damn mind.

And as I enter an industry that never takes a break, here's to hoping I can hold onto my sanity for a few more years...